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Amanda Brady is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Grant Woollett is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Bill Wyatte commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

What a great idea.   A narrative, with the applicant indicating where this narrative is scored against a range of things that are important ot the employer.   Cynefin.

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Elizabeth Watts is now contributing to a Challenge Raising Awareness of Foster Care

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Hans Tilstra is now contributing to a Challenge Raising Awareness of Foster Care

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Hans Tilstra commented on the Challenge Raising Awareness of Foster Care

This reminds me of Robert Putnam's 'Bowling Alone' - the theme that communities are becoming more disconnected, and less likely to host an exchange student or foster a child. Instead, we tend to take on a fee-paying international student instead.

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Pallavi Verma is now contributing to a Challenge Raising Awareness of Foster Care

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Paul Jordan is now contributing to a Challenge Raising Awareness of Foster Care

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Bruce Muirhead is now contributing to a Challenge Raising Awareness of Foster Care

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Rory Ford is now contributing to a Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

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Rory Ford commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

There may be benefits in drawing from lessons in enabling digital learning for employment and entrepreneurship. Particularly around creating an engaging experience and different ways to connect people to digital services. 

This report includes cases studies of different initiatives to promote digital adoption developing countries by non-profits:

https://www.accenture.com/t20170206T201908Z__w__/us-en/_acnmedia/PDF-42/Accenture-Digital-Adoption-Report.pdf

This report looks at how to design and scale digital and blended learning programs to improve employment and entrepreneurship outcomes:

https://www.accenture.com/t20160119T105855__w__/us-en/_acnmedia/PDF-5/Accenture-Digital-Learning-Report-and-How-To-Guide_Full.pdf 

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Stephen Grey commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

Sorry to be so long replying.

Given a free hand here, I would ask employers and job seekers to augment formal information, which I understand is required, not least for legal and compliance purposes, with observations and short narrative form material that might, for a job seeker, talk about an experience of something they have found rewarding, not necessarily in work, or, for an employer, talk about something that illustrates what it is like to work in this organisation or role. The form of those inputs and the prompts to elicit them have to be devised careful to suit the context but that can be done.

I would then provide a means for the contributors to signify what they believe that their observation or narrative illustrates about matters that might be relevant to the potential relationship between an employer and employee. These too have to be devised to suit the context but might encompass things such as a predisposition for independence, leadership, team work, working in isolation (can be important in some roles), social aspects of a work environment - only illustrations of the sort of thing that stakeholders might decide to include.

The signification by employers placing an opportunity and by job seekers exploring opportunities provides a slightly abstracted mechanism to link parties with aligned interests. Being a little abstracted, it allows for the diversity of requirements on both sides to be unconstrained, rather than locking them into a scheme of fixed characteristics (rate your requirements on these scales from 1 to 10).

All this is feasible using an approach known generically as sense making and there are online tools to support the process.

The key is accepting the fact that we cannot hope to capture all the characteristics of an employer, a job and a potential applicant that will determine the value of them getting to know one another better for all instances up front in a form that can be ossified in a data schema. Something that is designed to accommodate the complexity of the situation from the outset and provide a pathway to identifying possible matches is the gold standard and I don't see why it should not be tried.

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Peter Grimbeek commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

More generally, Jacob Nielsen many years ago set up criteria for usability in relation to websites and other human-machine interfaces, and applied it to the early Apple OS interface (to best of my recollection). His site is still of interest to those that aim for optimal user experiences (https://www.nngroup.com/).

I note that the challenge listed five points. The first of these was the current experience of customers receiving digital services. Previous comments suggest that these experiences are not entirely joyful. It is not surprising that some of the blackest joke lines involve attempts to access services digitally. It seems only fair that public services previously characterised as Kafkaesque should continue to maintain this reputation online.

The second was to enquire about digital sites that people with complex needs already use with ease. Facebook comes instantly to mind. It offers relative ease of use and a range of options. Certainly there are traps for the unwary, but not enough to deter users from entering in and creating pages that replace websites in many cases.

In terms of national and international studies on how to make digital services accessible, I would refer you to Jacob Nielsen (mentioned above).

A sub-clause asks about creating good customer experiences for disadvantaged people. This is a far harder question. I wonder if the disadvantaged don't in fact require face-to-face (3-D) interactions. Perhaps Centrelink and other agencies could (and perhaps already do) aim to provide a digital interface for those who can cope, while retaining physical facades for those that cannot.

The question about flexible digital services that scale and adjust according to user needs is another one of those impossible asks. A range of organisations have tried and failed to achieve this aim. The recent Census is possibly an example of how hard it can be to anticipate and scale to accommodate peaks in demand. ObamaCare's digital interface also crashed initially, and required specialist expertise to save the day. I wonder then if digital agencies don't have to be prepared to pay the price (external verifiable expertise) as opposed to relying on IBM or the in-house crew to save the day.

The final question concerns initiatives for better connecting people to digital services (e.g., peer-to-peer learning). In this regard, one option would be to enquire from universities how interfaces such as BlackBoard (commonly used for staff-student communications about courses, etc) have fared in terms of fostering peer-to-peer learning, etc.

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Peter Grimbeek is now contributing to a Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

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Guy Collishaw is now contributing to a Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

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Hans Tilstra commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

One potential way of helping protect the individual yet help target services, is to consider what Apple have coined as 'Differential Privacy technology. "Starting with iOS 10, Apple is using Differential Privacy technology to help discover the usage patterns of a large number of users without compromising individual privacy. To obscure an individual’s identity, Differential Privacy adds mathematical noise to a small sample of the individual’s usage pattern. As more people share the same pattern, general patterns begin to emerge, which can inform and enhance the user experience."

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Lindley Edwards is now contributing to a Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

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Lindley Edwards commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

The most important thing is human centred design. Whilst this article references schools in the US it discusses what is needed to design around humans. it https://ssir.org/articles/entry/human_centered_systems_minded_design?utm_source=Enews&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=SSIR_Now&utm_content=Title

In addition it is not just about creating algorithms that match employers and job seekers, but important to give people pathways to make themselves more employable and link to appropriate micro credentialing education offerings that improve job opportunities and employability. 

Care and consideration should be shown to those people unable to access online digitized services who may not have computer or digital devices or broadband access, due to remoteness, family circumstances or skills or financial constraints.

So my bottom line is design is everything.  Also there are things in that will be in the Government remit and things that are not. That is where partnerships and alliances will come in. I believe you need a systems integrated solution not just a sliver of services approach.

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David Kaldor is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Elissa Doxey is now contributing to a Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

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Elissa Doxey commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

Having recently used Medicare online (via MyGov) and the Medicare Express Plus App, I'd suggest there's still not enough cross-over of data that people expect should be shared by both platforms (i.e. being able to check on claim process).

For accessibility, it's not enough to have a responsive app - it also needs to have the option to get assistance from within the app - whether through a chatbot, or an option to call the appropriate area (rather than just referring the user to a generic contact page for the whole department).

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Gaith Bader commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

The digital landscape and Internet use has vastly changed in the last 10-15 years with major inroads in relation of shifting the thinking on the Internet from a play thing to a utility that is becoming a human right. In fact broadband in some countries, such as Finland, broadband has been legislated as a legal right to its citizens since 2010 (http://www.bbc.com/news/10461048) .

Now that the Internet is an essential mode of communication that all citizens need to use, accessibility’s importance becomes an order of magnitude more relevant. Which is why accessibility standards have come a long way since the early days of the Internet, which resembled the wild west!

The latest version of Accessibility standards The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) v2 with its three levels of compliance has reached maturity with less emphasis on ticking boxes of compliance and more on actual usability.

 

To get an equal for all digital presence the line of thinking needs to shift from compliance to usability; sites need to be built from the ground up with both accessibility and usability in mind. User Experience (UX) need to be the centre of web service design with actual evidence based methodology employed at every stage of development cycle.

 

What does all this mean in practice?

  • Employ UX experts
  • Have professional writing for the web guidelines
  • Utilise accessibility standards from the beginning and test every solution with available tools. Australia has one of the best companies to help and support others to comply with accessibility standards AccessibilityOz which makes compliance with accessibility much more manageable for small and large organisations.
  • Local and federal governments need to cater for people that are at a disadvantage with technology for one reason or another, this happens by extending support models in practical locations that all citizens are able to reach, such as at local public libraries with trained staff that are available to help people to perform online tasks related to government services if they are not able to do so themselves. This would be in addition to standard support numbers provided for regular issues with using the service during working hours.

 

If you go for example to a government website like Centrelink, putting aside what the government of the day wants the purpose of the website to be, trying to figure out how to do any procedure or process on the website require a very high degree of inside knowledge of Centrelink speak, laws, search process and understanding. A higher degree university graduate would not find the website easy to understand or navigate. This breaks all UX design and writing for the web principles. It is a good case study of what not to do for a digital transformation of a government service. Looking at that website makes it clear that most of the decisions were made by managers and not designers with no user testing of any kind.

 

So to me for a successful digital transformation of services we need to have most if not all of the below elements:

  • User Experience (UX) design principles used
  • Writing for the web methodologies followed
  • Usability testing performed
  • Evidence based solutions deployed
  • Accessibility standards with minimum WSAG 2 AA compliance baked into the design and continually tested throughout the live of the web service
  • Made available an extensive and searchable FAQ to answer general questions about the government service being used
  • Phone help support made available during working hours and answered and resolved in a reasonable period (within a maximum of 10 minutes for general inquiries from the time of phone calls initiated)
  • Make physical help available at a reasonable close locations to all users, such as libraries with staff trained to how to help people who, for one reason or another, are disadvantaged by using technology.
  • Make language support services available for users with language barriers
  • Regular external audit of compliance with all of the above as standard with appropriate powers to compel compliance when it is found to be lacking with fines and possible job losses for persistent non-compliance.
  • Dedicated location with appropriate funding for complaints with expedient resolutions matrix.
  • An overhaul of legislations at all levels of government to make the above a reality.
  • A look at having a bill of rights that spells out what is considered a minimum rights of all citizens which would enable to shape all above mentioned legislations and compel action to make it all happen.
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Department of Jobs and Small Business commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

Thank you for sharing your personal experiences Stephen.

An online service could help address some of the issues you have raised. We are interested in learning more about a questionnaire and matching algorithm. What questions should be included to best match job seekers and employers?

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Department of Jobs and Small Business commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

Thanks Dario. Matching job seekers and employers is an important part of the recruitment process. Do you have more information on LinkedIn’s success in that field?

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Department of Jobs and Small Business commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

Hi Han I couldn’t get that link to work. Do you have another link to this study on algorithms?

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Department of Jobs and Small Business commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

Hi Michelle. Thanks for your post. Do you have a link or more information about human to human evidence?

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Department of Jobs and Small Business commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

Thanks Kevin, you raise good points about sharing data and reusing data.

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Department of Jobs and Small Business commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

Hi Tim, thanks for your post. Providing complementary services is an important part of providing quality experiences for job seekers.

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Department of Jobs and Small Business commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

Hi Hans, thanks for your post.

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Department of Jobs and Small Business commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

Hi Bill, thanks for the idea including links to other information. We will also look into Browsaloud to help make information accessible. Chatbots could be an option we could use. How do you see this function helping with our service offer?

 
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