Media and Communications

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Amanda Brady is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Grant Woollett is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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A new Solution was published Private

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A new Solution was published Private

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A new Solution was published Private

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Timothy London commented on the Solution Private

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Bruce Muirhead is now contributing to a Challenge Private

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Rosie Odsey is now contributing to a Challenge Private

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David Kaldor is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Michelle DALE is now contributing to a Challenge Building a Bolder, Faster Public Service

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Timothy London is now contributing to a Challenge Private

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MindHive commented on the Challenge Private

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Anonymous User commented on the Solution Private

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Timothy London commented on the Solution Private

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A new Solution was published Private

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Nick Corones is now contributing to a Challenge Transformational Leadership

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Rupert Russell is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Jose Ospina is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Rowena Judd is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Simon Reid is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Sam Hamilton is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Bill Wyatte commented on the Challenge How can we scale up rehabilitation in Queensland?

The medieval church was a source of knowledge and guidance for communities because its knowledge was written down, could be referred to and verbally provided to the illiterate congregation.  Education and communication advances diminished that central expert role.

If the providers of rehabilitation lack the capacity to fulfill demand, similarly making as much of their underpinning knowledge as publicly accessible as possible may engage the effort of individuals in new and unforeseen ways.

Nugget Coombs called this "devolution" in his landmark-and-still-relevant 1976 report into the review of Australian Government Administration.

 

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John Wells is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Kathleen Yeo is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Richard Ferrers is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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The Hopkins Centre commented on the Challenge How can we scale up rehabilitation in Queensland?

Thank you for these comments Bill, you address a major challenge we face every day in rehabilitation. No-one fully understands the journey people take across systems. Each system dabbles in a person's life, sometimes with hidden and unexpected consequences on another aspect of life or another system. The frustration experienced by end-users when they have to repeat their story usually results in withdrawal. Many of those injured in motor vehicle accidents are lost from health systems into criminal justice systems or social welfare systems necessitated by homelessness and unemployment, but the extent of this challenge is not well documented. Cost shifting is possible and this hides real need. One of our core programs at Hopkins Centre involves a focus on integrating administrative data across systems to see if we can plot journeys and better understand the way in which people who are severely injured are using services. We will be applying this knowledge back into the clinical and community system, but achieving the type of integration you refer to seems to be incredibly difficult. One of our longer-term aims is to develop cross-sectoral teams that can begin addressing some of these challenges. Such partnerships have worked really well before to tackle some of the fragmentation created by the situation you highlight. 

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Rod Glover is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Piet Filet is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Bill Wyatte is now contributing to a Challenge How can we scale up rehabilitation in Queensland?

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Bill Wyatte commented on the Challenge How can we scale up rehabilitation in Queensland?

The global-national-state-local cascade nominated by the WHO stops before its logical end-point. 

A person.

Each of the human services programs with which a person may come in contact has unique insights into that person.  Unique, and limited to their narrow interest in the person.

Connecting those diverse insights will enable service providers to better understand a persons' circumstance and needs and better fulfil those needs. 

Lack of connection means missed opportunities, foregone leverage of existing effort and blockages to innovation-via-interdisciplinary sharing.  We may successfully resolve a bit of a person's situation via one program, but still not alleviate that person's major challenges.  Investment may not get the best possible results.

It is unrealistic to expect that rehab will drive such integration.  However, such integration will universally benefit all major streams of publicly-funded intervention, including rehabilitation.

Person-to-person manual sharing of insights is not a practical option.  People engaged in human services are too busy doing to be diverted to being transactional-level information whisperers and wranglers.  It must be electronic, automated, immediate and seamless.  "I need to know - I see it".

Services can become proactive rather than responsive.  Pennies of prevention.

Once the joined-up information is available to service providers, it is also there for policy analysts and decision-makers.

This knowledge integration will positively underpin most of the ten WHO priorities, while it is not clear that any of those priorities will be achieved in its absence.

 
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