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Amanda Brady is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Grant Woollett is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Bill Wyatte commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

What a great idea.   A narrative, with the applicant indicating where this narrative is scored against a range of things that are important ot the employer.   Cynefin.

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Rory Ford is now contributing to a Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

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Rory Ford commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

There may be benefits in drawing from lessons in enabling digital learning for employment and entrepreneurship. Particularly around creating an engaging experience and different ways to connect people to digital services. 

This report includes cases studies of different initiatives to promote digital adoption developing countries by non-profits:

https://www.accenture.com/t20170206T201908Z__w__/us-en/_acnmedia/PDF-42/Accenture-Digital-Adoption-Report.pdf

This report looks at how to design and scale digital and blended learning programs to improve employment and entrepreneurship outcomes:

https://www.accenture.com/t20160119T105855__w__/us-en/_acnmedia/PDF-5/Accenture-Digital-Learning-Report-and-How-To-Guide_Full.pdf 

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Ben Novakovic commented on the Solution Private

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Ben Novakovic is now contributing to a Challenge Private

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Ben Novakovic commented on the Solution Private

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Stephen Grey commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

Sorry to be so long replying.

Given a free hand here, I would ask employers and job seekers to augment formal information, which I understand is required, not least for legal and compliance purposes, with observations and short narrative form material that might, for a job seeker, talk about an experience of something they have found rewarding, not necessarily in work, or, for an employer, talk about something that illustrates what it is like to work in this organisation or role. The form of those inputs and the prompts to elicit them have to be devised careful to suit the context but that can be done.

I would then provide a means for the contributors to signify what they believe that their observation or narrative illustrates about matters that might be relevant to the potential relationship between an employer and employee. These too have to be devised to suit the context but might encompass things such as a predisposition for independence, leadership, team work, working in isolation (can be important in some roles), social aspects of a work environment - only illustrations of the sort of thing that stakeholders might decide to include.

The signification by employers placing an opportunity and by job seekers exploring opportunities provides a slightly abstracted mechanism to link parties with aligned interests. Being a little abstracted, it allows for the diversity of requirements on both sides to be unconstrained, rather than locking them into a scheme of fixed characteristics (rate your requirements on these scales from 1 to 10).

All this is feasible using an approach known generically as sense making and there are online tools to support the process.

The key is accepting the fact that we cannot hope to capture all the characteristics of an employer, a job and a potential applicant that will determine the value of them getting to know one another better for all instances up front in a form that can be ossified in a data schema. Something that is designed to accommodate the complexity of the situation from the outset and provide a pathway to identifying possible matches is the gold standard and I don't see why it should not be tried.

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Rosie Odsey commented on the Solution Private

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MindHive commented on the Solution Private

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MindHive commented on the Solution Private

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Bruce Muirhead is now contributing to a Challenge Private

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A new Solution was published Private

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Rosie Odsey is now contributing to a Challenge Private

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Rosie Odsey commented on the Challenge Private

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Peter Grimbeek commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

More generally, Jacob Nielsen many years ago set up criteria for usability in relation to websites and other human-machine interfaces, and applied it to the early Apple OS interface (to best of my recollection). His site is still of interest to those that aim for optimal user experiences (https://www.nngroup.com/).

I note that the challenge listed five points. The first of these was the current experience of customers receiving digital services. Previous comments suggest that these experiences are not entirely joyful. It is not surprising that some of the blackest joke lines involve attempts to access services digitally. It seems only fair that public services previously characterised as Kafkaesque should continue to maintain this reputation online.

The second was to enquire about digital sites that people with complex needs already use with ease. Facebook comes instantly to mind. It offers relative ease of use and a range of options. Certainly there are traps for the unwary, but not enough to deter users from entering in and creating pages that replace websites in many cases.

In terms of national and international studies on how to make digital services accessible, I would refer you to Jacob Nielsen (mentioned above).

A sub-clause asks about creating good customer experiences for disadvantaged people. This is a far harder question. I wonder if the disadvantaged don't in fact require face-to-face (3-D) interactions. Perhaps Centrelink and other agencies could (and perhaps already do) aim to provide a digital interface for those who can cope, while retaining physical facades for those that cannot.

The question about flexible digital services that scale and adjust according to user needs is another one of those impossible asks. A range of organisations have tried and failed to achieve this aim. The recent Census is possibly an example of how hard it can be to anticipate and scale to accommodate peaks in demand. ObamaCare's digital interface also crashed initially, and required specialist expertise to save the day. I wonder then if digital agencies don't have to be prepared to pay the price (external verifiable expertise) as opposed to relying on IBM or the in-house crew to save the day.

The final question concerns initiatives for better connecting people to digital services (e.g., peer-to-peer learning). In this regard, one option would be to enquire from universities how interfaces such as BlackBoard (commonly used for staff-student communications about courses, etc) have fared in terms of fostering peer-to-peer learning, etc.

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Peter Grimbeek is now contributing to a Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

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Guy Collishaw is now contributing to a Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

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Bob Dick commented on the Challenge Big Australia

There have been several suggestions for regional development rather than further increasing the size of our larger cities.  I’m not persuaded that this has to be either/or.

It’s understandable that citizens don’t wish large cities to undermine or destroy the pleasure of living there.  I live in Brisbane, and experience the way its growth is destroying some of its character.  Do large cities have to be unpleasant to live in?  I suspect not.

There is evidence I’ve seen that city size is associated with increased creativity and innovation.  Might it be that good design would allow those benefits to be achieved without suffering the disadvantage of size.

Assume cities continue to grow.  That need not prevent provincial centres also experiencing growth.  Here is Queensland (and I presume elsewhere) many provincial centres are losing citizens to the coastal strip.  I know that some would like to reverse that trend.

I’m venturing beyond my expertise here, and am willing to be corrected.  For both cities and provincial centres, though, it seems to be that it needn’t be size per se.  With good design, I assume many sizes can be beneficial.

 

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Bob Dick commented on the Challenge Big Australia

I think it helps to separate the issue of city size into two parts.  On the one hand, as several have said, the increased size can be at the cost of citizen well-being.  On the other hand, I understand that creativity and innovation and entrepreneurship are enhanced in larger cities.

I'm not persuaded that it is an imperative that larger cities are less pleasant to live in.  I would have thought that good design could counter, or at least ameliorate, that.

And does this have to be either/or?  There are provincial centres (here in Queensland, and I presume elsewhere) that are slowly losing people to the coastal strip.  I assume they would welcome an influx of new citizens.  Encouraging redevelopment of provincial centres does not need to be at the cost of larger cities.

 This is not an area of expertise for me, and I'm happy to be corrected.  At this stage, however, it seems to me that -- whatever is done -- it is done deliberately and with good design.

 

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Peter Grimbeek commented on the Challenge Big Australia

Previous comments have focused on the nexus between population growth and infrastructure. Here population growth is the problem and infrastructure is the solution. Infrastructure considered included fast rain-networks, the development of regional centres (would benefit from a real NBN), and questions about the management of water and land. Also, there is some emphasis on the global nature of these problems and solutions (aka, the global village).

My tack is a bit different. I would argue that our population might be growing but it is also aging, as is that in much of the first world, and also China. So, while the population might increase, the labour force is not necessarily going to be large enough nor will it be sufficiently skilled to deal with the many challenges associated with the incoming post-industrial economy.

These are not new issues. In 2008, just as the financial crisis was entering the room, one conversation was about how Australia was going to maintain a viable labour force in the face of an aging population and the increasing demand for highly skilled labour. The financial crisis slowly left the room but these two things remain with us.

One solution canvassed at the time was to develop an internationally based labour force that could do the work and then go away again. A reason for relying on such a labour force is the limit on developing the necessary skills on-shore. This limit also remains in place. For example, when driverless trucks and then cabs become part of the industrial landscape, what happens to those who can drive a vehicle day and night but cannot take on more highly skilled work?

From this dismal perspective, the challenge of the future for Australia, as elsewhere, is not only whether we will be big enough or too big for the global village but also how best to deal with those shunted aside by automation, etc., and how best to deal with an increasing number of aged people.

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Peter Grimbeek is now contributing to a Challenge Big Australia

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Hans Tilstra commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

One potential way of helping protect the individual yet help target services, is to consider what Apple have coined as 'Differential Privacy technology. "Starting with iOS 10, Apple is using Differential Privacy technology to help discover the usage patterns of a large number of users without compromising individual privacy. To obscure an individual’s identity, Differential Privacy adds mathematical noise to a small sample of the individual’s usage pattern. As more people share the same pattern, general patterns begin to emerge, which can inform and enhance the user experience."

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Lindley Edwards is now contributing to a Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

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Lindley Edwards commented on the Challenge Digitised services for job seekers

The most important thing is human centred design. Whilst this article references schools in the US it discusses what is needed to design around humans. it https://ssir.org/articles/entry/human_centered_systems_minded_design?utm_source=Enews&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=SSIR_Now&utm_content=Title

In addition it is not just about creating algorithms that match employers and job seekers, but important to give people pathways to make themselves more employable and link to appropriate micro credentialing education offerings that improve job opportunities and employability. 

Care and consideration should be shown to those people unable to access online digitized services who may not have computer or digital devices or broadband access, due to remoteness, family circumstances or skills or financial constraints.

So my bottom line is design is everything.  Also there are things in that will be in the Government remit and things that are not. That is where partnerships and alliances will come in. I believe you need a systems integrated solution not just a sliver of services approach.

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Lindley Edwards commented on the Solution A Big Australia

Agree with other commentators and would add we need to also consider World Population growth and refugees and what is an appropriate humanitarian response by Australia.  What is missing in many of these debates is an underlying strategy which road maps where Australia is going and what we should aspire to. It also needs to consider investment, infrastructure, our best responses at collective and individual level to structural changes and the use and care of physical resources and what is the social infrastructure we wish to have and maintain. 

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David Alexander is now contributing to a Challenge Big Australia

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David Kaldor is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Megan Baker is now contributing to a Challenge Big Australia

 
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