Health & Environment

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Elizabeth Watts is now contributing to a Challenge Raising Awareness of Foster Care

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Hans Tilstra is now contributing to a Challenge Raising Awareness of Foster Care

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Hans Tilstra commented on the Challenge Raising Awareness of Foster Care

This reminds me of Robert Putnam's 'Bowling Alone' - the theme that communities are becoming more disconnected, and less likely to host an exchange student or foster a child. Instead, we tend to take on a fee-paying international student instead.

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Pallavi Verma is now contributing to a Challenge Raising Awareness of Foster Care

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Paul Jordan is now contributing to a Challenge Raising Awareness of Foster Care

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Bruce Muirhead is now contributing to a Challenge Raising Awareness of Foster Care

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Michelle DALE is now contributing to a Challenge Building a Bolder, Faster Public Service

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Gillian Adams is now contributing to a Challenge Health, safety and wellbeing at work

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Rosie Odsey is now contributing to a Challenge Childrens Court of Queensland expert assistance pilot

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Rosie Odsey is now contributing to a Challenge Private

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Evelyn Chung is now contributing to a Challenge Health, safety and wellbeing at work

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Bruce Muirhead commented on the Solution Private

Private Comment
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Timothy London is now contributing to a Challenge Private

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Timothy London commented on the Challenge Private

Private Comment
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A new Solution was published Private

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Bruce Muirhead is now contributing to a Challenge Private

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Eidos Institute commented on the Challenge Private

Private Comment
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Nick Corones is now contributing to a Challenge Transformational Leadership

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Bill Wyatte commented on the Challenge How can we scale up rehabilitation in Queensland?

The medieval church was a source of knowledge and guidance for communities because its knowledge was written down, could be referred to and verbally provided to the illiterate congregation.  Education and communication advances diminished that central expert role.

If the providers of rehabilitation lack the capacity to fulfill demand, similarly making as much of their underpinning knowledge as publicly accessible as possible may engage the effort of individuals in new and unforeseen ways.

Nugget Coombs called this "devolution" in his landmark-and-still-relevant 1976 report into the review of Australian Government Administration.

 

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Andrew Shaw is now contributing to a Challenge Proactive models of public policy

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Leon Sterling commented on the Challenge Proactive models of public policy

A rather late entry to the discussion, but some support for thinking about proactive policy.

What I would like to add is that proactive Government policy can map to proactive Government services. In collaboration with Estonian research colleagues, Kuldar Taveter and Regina Sirendi, we are developing methods for designing proactive services. The design of services can include co-design and hence involve community consultation. We are comparing case studies between Estonia and Australia. The proactive services can and should be triggered by life events and business events. 

There are of course barriers to the implementation of the proactive services. But the services can be designed and implemented in a proactive way. 

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Amanda Reeves commented on the Solution Proactive Models of Public Policy

A proactive policy approach implies that rather than reacting to current events, a vision of a preferred future has been crafted and policy is designed in an intentional manner to move us towards that possible future by addressing the underlying cause of these issues. The adoption of a Strategic Foresight process in policy development can consider different possible futures, identify potential impacts from emerging trends, and drive discussion regarding organisational/government values and how they shape our decisions - this then informs strategy and flows down to inform tactical and operational activity. Recommended reference: Joseph Voros, (2003),"A generic foresight process framework", Foresight, Vol. 5 Iss 3 pp. 10 - 21, http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/14636680310698379

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Amanda Reeves is now contributing to a Challenge Proactive models of public policy

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Timothy London is now contributing to a Challenge Proactive models of public policy

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Mark Cantor commented on the Challenge Proactive models of public policy

Kevin,

Finance is certainly not my strong point, in fact I'm of the viewpoint that it corrupts most things, so i can't comment on financial strategies. BUT I would like to comment on your first paragraph.

You are correct in the fact that the effort, human and financial, to manage such consensus of a population is huge, but this is the first time in history that we now have such technology available to do such a thing. As you mention Mindhive is one example but may I also suggest Wikipedia as one of the most revolutionary and successful concepts of our age.

As an ultimate left field experiment, what if we downloaded our entire legislation to a wiki. With a few modifications including voting etc we might even have a solution.

Some people may argue that some of the negatives of wikipedia are not appropriate for such a thing, but I would suggest that our current political system, with political parties continuously putting the party above the people they are corrupting the intent of the process with lobbyists, donations etc.

I might also suggest that before anyone may question this concept, have a look at what exists behind the wikipedia front pages. The sandpits, and discussion systems that make up the editing and review process are potentially a better argument for democracy than our current system.

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Mark Cantor commented on the Challenge Proactive models of public policy

Another major issue with any policy direction whether set by the community or the government is compliance. Potentially as per speeding in the intro, but more importantly in industrial and commercial compliance with stated laws regulations and policies.

There are many examples where policy direction and objectives are not achieved because the government either cuts funding to regulatory bodies or removes their power or creates a policy of self governance or self regulation in a sector. 

Any policy objective or direction requires a feedback and control process to monitor, correct behaviour and continue to steer and drive the policy requirements.

Unfortunately we have many policy areas where the government sets and forgets and only reacts after some disaster hits the media. In many cases the lack of success was predictable from the beginning. The existing system for private supply of training courses etc is a case in point.

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Mark Cantor commented on the Challenge Proactive models of public policy

G'day Bill,

I agree that talking to the people and potentially the 'market' or community and using the myriad of tools now available should enable insight into what the population wants.

One of my concerns is when the case arises that what the market wants is not what is good for it. 

In some instances we need a level of leadership to make difficult decisions and policies for us.

The current use of focus groups by the major political parties does not provide any real leadership and direction for the country, it is just a attempt to win a popularity competition.

Is there a mechanism or a development to that approach where, the process can potentially generate a set of choices not popular but good for the country.

Obviously some areas such as monetary policy and taxation etc need a more sophisticated or restrained level of market driven selection.

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Mark Cantor commented on the Challenge Proactive models of public policy

A really good example of the existing democratically elected government process absolutely failing is the current state of the Australian power system.

What is our policy or 50 year vision for our power system?

Is it a national grid?
Is it totally isolated small micro-grids?
Is it supply your own? 
How does our power supply capability adapt and align with current environmental issues?

The Paris? agreement supposedly set some small part of this (carbon emissions) for the next thirty years.

Unfortunately our democratic government cannot cope with managing our infrastructure to achieve that plan.

One issue that comes up in many of these citizen jury democracy discussions is that one of the problems with most forms of democracy is that the people making decisions do not understand the technical issues around the policy. As an example of this is the use of the "clean coal" concept. 

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Mark Cantor commented on the Challenge Proactive models of public policy

G'day Corey,

I believe what you have just described is typical of our society and very reactive. Please don't get me wrong, it is a great approach and worthwhile and should form part of a much larger proactive policy response.

All my training and the fact that the issue reoccurred leads to the conclusion that the root cause of the problem was not addressed.

So if I was to suggest that a potential root cause of that particular issue was to be found in the following areas;- lack of appropriate social housing supply- lack of suitable education facilities - lack of employment- and I think one of the biggest issues in our society is a lack of place and belonging in our community, even a lack of feeling of contribution.

Note: The first part of this would be an appropriate investigation.

I would suggest that our long term 50 year vision should be something that addresses those issues.- increased social housing (enough housing for the entire population)- a sense of belonging and contribution for the entire population

The more detailed sub policies are the processes and projects and actions that we believe will head us in that direction.

The process you describe above should actually be an initial first part of the longer term project to achieve the long term vision. If we carry out projects like yours as part of a longer term strategy and plan, then the investment made should not be lost.

Maybe that sounds a little bit socialist but I don't think the existing neo-libralism approach is helping much, especially with ever increasing technology.

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Mark Cantor commented on the Challenge Proactive models of public policy

In some of the continuous improvement research I have looked at, one of the main things that I keep seeing is the total lack of future vision.

To me a policy is setting the future vision (10, 20, 50 years) of where we want to be and then trying to define the plan to get there.

That plan may include behavioural change component policies using either laws and either discipline or incentives. 

The plan may need reviewing periodically. Periodic review may come from numerous places, but one that is sadly ignored by our government is recommendations from any number of commissions or enquiries. Indigenous custody recommendations one currently in the news. 

Or "Closing the Gap", or an old one "No child shall live in poverty".

These are very worthy visions, but there are many others much more specific with regard to healthcare, education etc.

More simply put, what do we want our country to look like in 50 years?

Creating a process and mechanism to understand that would be a very good start.

 
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The Commonwealth Department of Industry and Science recently identified Health and Environment on a list of nine top priorities. Decisions relating to these policy fields require objectives that have real longevity. In such sensitive areas, broad consultation and community participation are essential.

The growth of digital enterprises, coupled with Government initiatives to promote democracy in policymaking processes, is a phenomenon that will shape the identity of Australia as a science nation. A shift of this nature has a real ability to transform Healthcare and Environmental policy and strategy development into ‘for-the-public’ and ‘by-the-public’, empowering Australians in a way that would positively impact Australia’s population.

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