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EPSDD, ACT Government commented on the Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

Thanks Peter, good questions. There are certainly different ways to circumvent the 'duck curve'. Smart charging is another avenue to explore further.

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EPSDD, ACT Government commented on the Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

Thanks for sharing your views with us Maurice. Moving people in and out from other sustainable means of transportation like light rail stations is an opportunity that needs to be explored further too.

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EPSDD, ACT Government commented on the Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

Hi Guy. Thanks for your thoughts. As we move forward we will need to find the right balance between subsidizing the installation of charging stations, facilitating the installation of them by commercial partners, and ‘doing nothing’ is a valid option that needs to be considered too.

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EPSDD, ACT Government commented on the Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

Hi Roy, thanks for your ideas. The transformation of the mindset from fuel station network to charge at home and fast-charge in town will be a necessary behaviour change for a charging network to work. Fortunately, since the trips in Canberra are relatively short (within range of most commercially available vehicles) this has to be taken into account when traveling interstate/coastal regions. There are some initiatives as the battery trailer which are promising to increase range https://evobsession.com/electric-car-battery-trailer-unveiled-nomadic-power/. Finally, as part of the future actions from our 2018-21 Action Plan, we will conduct a feasibility assessment for the installation of covered car parks with solar powered vehicle charging stations.

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EPSDD, ACT Government commented on the Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

Thanks for your comment Thomas. It is important that the infrastructure is located within walking distance of important areas such as restaurants, sport centres, and other amenities. As you mentioned, distance to those areas will likely determine the usage of those charging stations. There is a growing number of communication technologies being developed for electric vehicles, and these stations should be able to adapt to those technologies as well.

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EPSDD, ACT Government commented on the Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

We are interested in hearing ideas about how we can incentivise public uptake of electric vehicles. Similar to Brisbane, we also currently have dedicated car parks and free charging stations available in select public car parks for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. Other incentives include a variable motor vehicle stamp duty scheme where zero emission vehicles are exempt from first time registration stamp duty and 20% discount on annual registration.

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EPSDD, ACT Government commented on the Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

Thanks Maryann for your thoughts! You have some good points on how the community may have different expectations of charging infrastructure in different environments.

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EPSDD, ACT Government commented on the Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

Thanks Oscar! Good location suggestions for charging stations.

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EPSDD, ACT Government commented on the Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

As our city will transition to 100% renewable electricity in 2020, exploring opportunities to electrify as many modes of transport as possible and what infrastructure is an important part of the puzzle. It is indeed also important that we explore other options (such as hydrogen) for how our city can move to a zero emissions transport network. Our Action Plan 2018-21 also includes initiatives to promote active travel options to displace car travel with more walking, cycling and public transport.

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EPSDD, ACT Government commented on the Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

Thanks William. You have made some interesting comments on the benefits of complementary fuel cell electric vehicles and battery electric vehicles infrastructure, particularly in regards to the benefits of FCEV for long distance travel. Our Action Plan notes the existence of different types of zero emissions vehicles including BEVs, FCEVs and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. It is important that we get the mix right to suit many different transit needs and we will consider this when exploring options for a future ACT zero emissions vehicle infrastructure.

 

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EPSDD, ACT Government commented on the Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

Hi Tim, thanks for your comment. Charging at home vs charging at work is a consideration we will carefully evaluate towards the roll-out of our public network. Charging needs for longer journey’s will also be considered and we are working with other governments, business and industry groups on this challenge. We will be listening to the views and experiences of e-vehicle owners such as yourself carefully to inform the decision process.

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Zoe Piper is now contributing to a Challenge Australian Soft Power

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Ben Sullivan is now contributing to a Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

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Michele Chaseling is now contributing to a Challenge Australian Soft Power

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Gerarda Frederick is now contributing to a Challenge Australian Soft Power

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Yash Varma is now contributing to a Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

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Yash Varma commented on the Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

As an existing EV driver living in Canberra, it is interesting to be looking into this as I deal with this on a daily basis.  I think one thing people need to consider is that people really want chargers at convenient locations and also that many of the local drivers will charge at home.  This may not be possible for people living in apartments or people who don't have the infrastructure but I do feel the majority will charge this way overnight much like you charge your phone when you get home. 

One of my biggest concerns has been having cars that are non electric cars parking in spaces that are there for EV's .  It is not clear what the legality is on this and many non EV drivers are not aware of the impact this has on someone who needs to charge (or even care to be frank).  This is particularly relevant when events are on or it is busy as people can't find parking so think it is ok to park in an EV spot as it is free.  I would like to see this clearly addressed so it is not a grey area in terms of what the law says.   

In terms of the other points.

  1. Identifying the best locations for charging stations.  Shopping malls, public car parks, workplace car parks or areas where there are other activities for people to do whilst their car is charging. 
  2. Ensuring the right mix of charging speeds and types.I feel the faster the better with type 2 being the most flexible.  It depends on the numbers of chargers available and time people can spend at the charging park as it would not be good to have people park for multiple hours on a high speed charger as the car would be fully charged within an hour or two max.  I think different chargers for different time periods.  ie. short parking should have high speed and longer term parking slower speeds.  
  3. The pros and cons of private and public ownership of charging infrastructure.If you want the system to be open I think it should be public but there is obviously a cost to this.  If it is privatised I think serious consideration needs to be made in terms of the standards used.  
  4. Payment systems and user models (e.g. open access versus membership-based charging).I believe it should be open access at this early stage to encourage adoption.  After that you could have a membership or hybrid pay as you go approach
  5. Installing the right number of charging stations to meet increasing demand.I believe some research needs to be done in terms of the number of charging stations over time but another approach could be to use platforms like Everty as the demand grows https://everty.com.au/.

I am happy to discuss this all further if you need clarification.

PS.  Hope this is not too late.

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David Kearns is now contributing to a Challenge Australian Soft Power

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David Kearns commented on the Challenge Australian Soft Power

Make greater use of the best international resource we have: our higher education sector.

Many international students who graduate from Australia's universities return home to form the next generation of leaders in their countries. While they are here, we have the opportunity to build the connections and cultural influence that's vitually impossible at a distance.

I've worked in or around tertiary education for many years. Sadly, too many international students live fairly isolated lives while studying here. By working hard to engage with and inspire these young people, we have a chance to sow the seeds of Australian soft power around the world in the future.

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Fuwen Yang is now contributing to a Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

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Fuwen Yang commented on the Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

For the proposed problems, they look the mathematical problems. We need to define the objectives and constraints of EV charging stations, and then develop a software to provide an optimal or sub-optimal solution. This would be great for future  plan of EV charging stations for cities.

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Mark Hemmingsen is now contributing to a Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

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Mark Hemmingsen commented on the Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

Hi All

Apologies for the late comment.

 

It has been brought to my attention that the new charging stations at the Canberra Center are for either Tesla or type 2. I would suggest that a standard of type 2 SOCKET be used in public spaces be used to minimise the amount of charging adaptors that EV owners need to carry.

Also, demand side.management is imperative to ensure that trip free charging us achieved at all times.

Regards,

Mark

Electric Vehicles Canberra

 

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Lisa Geraghty is now contributing to a Challenge Australian Soft Power

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William Bell is now contributing to a Challenge Australian Soft Power

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William Bell commented on the Challenge Australian Soft Power

Developing deep soft power with integrity or shallow soft power without integrity

For long-term soft power, we need to consider soft power with integrity that is alignment between perception and reality. Otherwise, soft power becomes a hollow marketing exercise in propaganda and people will eventually see the misalignment and the country losses credibility.

An example of a misalignment and loss of credibility includes the soft power image that German products are high quality and produced by people of integrity. The company VW and the diesel emissions scandal punctured this soft power image. The consequence is that people question the value in paying a premium for German products when high quality and cheaper versions are usually available from either Japan or South Korea.

We can view soft power as derived from either natural or social resources. Australia’s natural resources are immense and well marketed to create a positive image for Australia.  However, there is a misalignment between perception and reality or lack of integrity, including

  • the decline in the quality of the Great Barrier Reef and waterways and
  • the ongoing land clearance to develop marginal farming land but with large capital gains.

Weak governance is allowing our natural resources to be undermined. This weak governance highlights flaws in our democracy that is one of Australia’s principle social resources and a foundation of Australian values, showing a lack of integrity. For example, the inability to address climate change and growing wealth inequality highlights weaknesses in Australia's democracy. There are at least two major causes:

  • Political donations misalign the interests of the electorate and politicians, and
  • Binary politics and political wedging reduce the ability to address complex problems.

There is a conflict of interest between politicians’ electoral duty to perform evidence based decision-making in an impartial manner to the benefit of the electorate and taking political donations from companies within the fossil fuel industry, banking industry or wherever else. There is a major accountability and integrity requirements gulf between public servants and politicians. Political donations are a major source of this gulf. The privileged political access gained by political donations is at odds with core Australian principles of openness and fairness. Funding for political activities require independent review by the Productivity Commission to realign the interest of politicians with the electorate to result in transparent government in line with Australian values.

Australia’s hybrid US Federal and UK Westminster political system was a combination of the two most powerful and successful democracies at the time of federation. However, one hundred years later, the didactic approach of the binary political system is proving inadequate to solve the more interconnected complex problems in a more interconnected world. Diversity proves important in solving these wicked problems. Fostering diversity is a core Australian principle but lacking in the makeup of Australian politicians. Proportional representation can improve the diversity of ideas discussed in parliament. The Productivity Commission would be well placed to lead the public discussion on an upgrade to Australia’s dated political system and make an international comparison of the effectiveness of proportional representation systems to solve wicked problems. Australia’s government functions well at solving non-wicked problems.

Developing deep soft power would require putting in train processes to address the above deficiencies in Australia’s integrity. Developing shallow soft power would only require a marketing budget to produce propaganda.

The ideas in this article are expanded upon in the publication “Inclusive growth and climate change adaptation and mitigation in Australia and China: Removing barriers to solving wicked problems”. http://apo.org.au/node/133226

 

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mike o'hanlon commented on the Solution Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

Battery buffered fast charging is a concept where real estate is available, such as on the edge of a built up area.

The battery could be providing typical grid support so the net impact of the installation was always positive.

 

 

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mike o'hanlon commented on the Solution Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

Fast charging on high street retail/cafe strips where a brief stop can provide a meaningful battery top up whilst the driver grabs a coffee or similar.

Placing charging infrastructure in high foot traffic locations will help with project visibility.

 

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mike o'hanlon is now contributing to a Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

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Peter Grimbeek commented on the Challenge Designing a city wide electric vehicle charging network

William Bell mentioned the duck curve as an example of how solar powered energy can distort the energy generated by utilities. He suggests that EV charging could further exacerbate this situation - in effect making the duck bigger.

 

As William would be aware, the duck curve can be minimised (excised) by adding energy storage units (i.e., batteries) to the mix (https://www.powermag.com/developments-in-energy-storage-could-spell-the-end-of-the-duck-curve/?pagenum=1).

 

The South Australian Tesla array is a local example worth a look. Initial reports suggest that its operational efficiency is surpassing expectations in terms of keeping the flow of electricity in the normal range.

 

I wonder then if an increasing shift to such arrays might make the duck curve a curious historical event regardless of the advent of EV charging.

 
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