Law and Regulation

What is happening in this category

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Amanda Brady is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Grant Woollett is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Elizabeth Watts is now contributing to a Challenge Raising Awareness of Foster Care

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Hans Tilstra is now contributing to a Challenge Raising Awareness of Foster Care

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Hans Tilstra commented on the Challenge Raising Awareness of Foster Care

This reminds me of Robert Putnam's 'Bowling Alone' - the theme that communities are becoming more disconnected, and less likely to host an exchange student or foster a child. Instead, we tend to take on a fee-paying international student instead.

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Pallavi Verma is now contributing to a Challenge Raising Awareness of Foster Care

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Paul Jordan is now contributing to a Challenge Raising Awareness of Foster Care

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Bruce Muirhead is now contributing to a Challenge Raising Awareness of Foster Care

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David Kaldor is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Nick Corones is now contributing to a Challenge Trust me...I'm a public servant

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Rupert Russell is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Jose Ospina is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Rowena Judd is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Susan Zhao commented on the Challenge Private

Private Comment
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Simon Reid is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Sam Hamilton is now contributing to a Challenge The MindHive Book

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Merryn Smith commented on the Topic Children and young people at risk of offending

Thanks for sharing your thoughts Bill.  Health and language skills are a recent focus of reform within the youth justice system.  Ensuring that children receive similar assistance much earlier before they are involved in offending would be a useful preventative approach and support broader lifelong wellbeing outcomes.  

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Bill Wyatte commented on the Challenge How can we scale up rehabilitation in Queensland?

The medieval church was a source of knowledge and guidance for communities because its knowledge was written down, could be referred to and verbally provided to the illiterate congregation.  Education and communication advances diminished that central expert role.

If the providers of rehabilitation lack the capacity to fulfill demand, similarly making as much of their underpinning knowledge as publicly accessible as possible may engage the effort of individuals in new and unforeseen ways.

Nugget Coombs called this "devolution" in his landmark-and-still-relevant 1976 report into the review of Australian Government Administration.

 

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Bill Wyatte commented on the Topic Children and young people at risk of offending

It may be useful to change the performance measures for primary schooling so that children with mild-to-less-mild cognitive impairment are not pushed through as a "pass" while being unprepared for the world literacy-wise and life-skills-wise.  With possibly up to 9% of people having an IQ of less than 80, it will be useful to ensure that such people have the toolkit of skills they will need to make the most of the communication, problem solving, employment, housing and social opportunities that come their way.

Literacy and cognition appear to be big factors in many offenders' journeys, particularly when mental health and substance abuse factors also appear.

All children, particularly children appearing on education/justice radars as potentially requiring interventions or diversion, may benefit from eye-function testing.  The capacity to scan text.   Eye function seems to be a factor with nearly all illiterate adults, while there are indications that over 80% of male prisoners in Queensland have insufficient literacy to enrol in vocational training.   Figure the impacts of that on a person's life path.

I agree with Annette that the challenges that need action exist before the justice system gets involved.  If they are not acted upon when the justice system does get involved, then when?

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Andrew Shaw is now contributing to a Challenge Proactive models of public policy

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Merryn Smith commented on the Topic Children and young people at risk of offending

Thanks Annette.  A holistic approach starting pre-birth with maternal health would have to be best practice.

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Annette Herschtal commented on the Topic Children and young people at risk of offending

Start early. So much happens before school age. So much happens by age 2. Ensure strong maternal health services. Ramp up the quantity and training in disadvantaged areas so nurses know what to look for when they do home visits; and can provide early support for attachment, breastfeeding and positive role modelling. This stuff takes skill and resourcing. The later you leave it the harder it is to dial back the wheel to this crucial early stage.

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Leon Sterling commented on the Challenge Proactive models of public policy

A rather late entry to the discussion, but some support for thinking about proactive policy.

What I would like to add is that proactive Government policy can map to proactive Government services. In collaboration with Estonian research colleagues, Kuldar Taveter and Regina Sirendi, we are developing methods for designing proactive services. The design of services can include co-design and hence involve community consultation. We are comparing case studies between Estonia and Australia. The proactive services can and should be triggered by life events and business events. 

There are of course barriers to the implementation of the proactive services. But the services can be designed and implemented in a proactive way. 

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Amanda Reeves commented on the Solution Proactive Models of Public Policy

A proactive policy approach implies that rather than reacting to current events, a vision of a preferred future has been crafted and policy is designed in an intentional manner to move us towards that possible future by addressing the underlying cause of these issues. The adoption of a Strategic Foresight process in policy development can consider different possible futures, identify potential impacts from emerging trends, and drive discussion regarding organisational/government values and how they shape our decisions - this then informs strategy and flows down to inform tactical and operational activity. Recommended reference: Joseph Voros, (2003),"A generic foresight process framework", Foresight, Vol. 5 Iss 3 pp. 10 - 21, http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/14636680310698379

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Amanda Reeves is now contributing to a Challenge Proactive models of public policy

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Timothy London is now contributing to a Challenge Proactive models of public policy

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Mark Cantor commented on the Challenge Proactive models of public policy

Kevin,

Finance is certainly not my strong point, in fact I'm of the viewpoint that it corrupts most things, so i can't comment on financial strategies. BUT I would like to comment on your first paragraph.

You are correct in the fact that the effort, human and financial, to manage such consensus of a population is huge, but this is the first time in history that we now have such technology available to do such a thing. As you mention Mindhive is one example but may I also suggest Wikipedia as one of the most revolutionary and successful concepts of our age.

As an ultimate left field experiment, what if we downloaded our entire legislation to a wiki. With a few modifications including voting etc we might even have a solution.

Some people may argue that some of the negatives of wikipedia are not appropriate for such a thing, but I would suggest that our current political system, with political parties continuously putting the party above the people they are corrupting the intent of the process with lobbyists, donations etc.

I might also suggest that before anyone may question this concept, have a look at what exists behind the wikipedia front pages. The sandpits, and discussion systems that make up the editing and review process are potentially a better argument for democracy than our current system.

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Mark Cantor commented on the Challenge Proactive models of public policy

Another major issue with any policy direction whether set by the community or the government is compliance. Potentially as per speeding in the intro, but more importantly in industrial and commercial compliance with stated laws regulations and policies.

There are many examples where policy direction and objectives are not achieved because the government either cuts funding to regulatory bodies or removes their power or creates a policy of self governance or self regulation in a sector. 

Any policy objective or direction requires a feedback and control process to monitor, correct behaviour and continue to steer and drive the policy requirements.

Unfortunately we have many policy areas where the government sets and forgets and only reacts after some disaster hits the media. In many cases the lack of success was predictable from the beginning. The existing system for private supply of training courses etc is a case in point.

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Mark Cantor commented on the Challenge Proactive models of public policy

G'day Bill,

I agree that talking to the people and potentially the 'market' or community and using the myriad of tools now available should enable insight into what the population wants.

One of my concerns is when the case arises that what the market wants is not what is good for it. 

In some instances we need a level of leadership to make difficult decisions and policies for us.

The current use of focus groups by the major political parties does not provide any real leadership and direction for the country, it is just a attempt to win a popularity competition.

Is there a mechanism or a development to that approach where, the process can potentially generate a set of choices not popular but good for the country.

Obviously some areas such as monetary policy and taxation etc need a more sophisticated or restrained level of market driven selection.

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Mark Cantor commented on the Challenge Proactive models of public policy

A really good example of the existing democratically elected government process absolutely failing is the current state of the Australian power system.

What is our policy or 50 year vision for our power system?

Is it a national grid?
Is it totally isolated small micro-grids?
Is it supply your own? 
How does our power supply capability adapt and align with current environmental issues?

The Paris? agreement supposedly set some small part of this (carbon emissions) for the next thirty years.

Unfortunately our democratic government cannot cope with managing our infrastructure to achieve that plan.

One issue that comes up in many of these citizen jury democracy discussions is that one of the problems with most forms of democracy is that the people making decisions do not understand the technical issues around the policy. As an example of this is the use of the "clean coal" concept. 

 
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Law and regulations are the building blocks of a coherent society. These frameworks influence each one of us without exception. With tremendous potential to create a fair society, legal and regualatory policies require an element of substantial public endorsement. MindHive, as a crowdsourcing platform, is a public vehicle that brings Government, Universities, Business and the broader community into one digital room. Through the MindHive platform effective policymaking, is empowered by the depth of the discussion, encompassing the views of each diverse and individual contributor.

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