Do you want to contribute to this Challenge?

Brisbane Innovate: Waste Economy

The Challenge

The Brisbane Innovate challenge: How might we create a new waste economy by unlocking waste as a resource, so that we can create jobs in new industries while reducing landfill and increasing markets for recycled materials? 

Brisbane is a clean, green and sustainable city. Our approach to sustainable living resulted in Brisbane being named Australia's Most Sustainable City in 2014 and 2016 at the Keep Australia Beautiful Australian Sustainable Cities Awards. Key to maintaining our vision for a clean, green, sustainable city is our ability to reduce, re-use and recycle waste.

As the financial and environmental costs associated with traditional resource sectors increase, alternatives such as recycling and resource recovery become more efficient. Turning the traditionally linear production process into a renewable cycle not only delivers environmental benefits by keeping material out of landfill, but can also deliver significant benefits for our economy, potentially creating new job opportunities and scalable, exportable industries.

In Brisbane. Clean, Green, Sustainable 2017-2031 Council commits to supporting business to adopt innovative production and distribution systems that minimise waste and build strong markets to re-purpose waste into usable products. We are looking to businesses, academia and peak bodies from across industry, to understand their role in the supply chain and work together to address this challenge and unlock the value of waste.

Why should we create a new waste economy?

The circular economy is gaining support as there is growing recognition of its financial, environmental and social value.

Waste contains valuable, recoverable resources. Cooking oil can become biodiesel, restaurant scraps can mulch city parks and pre-loved clothes can be turned into insulation. The opportunities to unlock the value of waste at an industry level are immense, however it requires significant coordination and collaboration from all parts of the ‘whole-of-life’ supply chain – from product designers and manufacturers to waste management and recycling industries.

Australians have indicated an unprecedented level of support for industry being part of the solution in creating a high value waste economy. In a study conducted by the Crosby Textor Group, 87% support making it compulsory for recycled content to be used in all packaging.

Currently, in Brisbane:

  • all recyclables (90,000 tonnes per annum), are sent to Brisbane’s recycling contractor. All paper, magazine, cardboard and cardboard packaging material is pulped and recycled directly onsite at their paper mill. Plastics, glass and metals are all sorted in bales and sent to local and overseas markets
  • domestic green waste recycling (85,000 tonnes per annum) is processed in Yatala where it is composted and turned into a range of organic products, such as soil and compost. 

Current Initiatives in Brisbane

A list of Council’s current initiatives and strategies around waste reduction are listed below.

Brisbane Innovate & the role of Mindhive

Brisbane Innovate is Council’s annual open innovation event, bringing together private industry, academia, local start-ups and the community to generate ideas to solve citywide challenges. This year’s challenges will focus on unlocking the value of waste, tackling social isolation and empowering local communities to create vibrant and proud neighbourhoods.

In 2018 we're using Mindhive to facilitate ongoing conversations between active-problem solvers, community members and the wider community of Mindhive to solve some of the city's wicked challenges.

What does success look like?

Following the summit event on 7 November, attendees will have an opportunity to refine their solutions and submit to Council. Council will then assess the solutions against the below criteria. 

For a solution to be considered by Council, it should:

To complete a submission, you will need to provide the following information:

  • contact details, solution name and challenge being solved
  • how the solution meets the criteria (500 words)
  • collaboration summary (500 words)
  • how you will deliver the solution, including the timeframe (500 words)
  • potential barriers to delivery and methods for overcoming them (500 words).

 

Challenge Opened: 12:38 AM, Monday 15 October 2018
Challenge Closes: 02:00 PM, Saturday 30 March 2019
Time to go: 129 days \ 19 hours \ 16 minutes

 

Do you want to contribute to this Challenge?

The context

Challenge Opened: 12:38 AM, Monday 15 October 2018
Challenge Closes: 02:00 PM, Saturday 30 March 2019
Time to go: 129 days \ 19 hours \ 16 minutes

Do you want to contribute to this Challenge?

Thought Leader

Troy McGrath - Business Development Manager
View profile
Yasmin Grigaliunas CEO & Co-founder
View profile
Alice Dahlberg
View profile
Bronte North
View profile
Kristian Goodacre Principal Consultant
View profile
Daniel Garcia Senior Project Planner - Source Protection
View profile
Deanna Borland-Sentinella
View profile
Peter Grimbeek Statistics & Methods Counsellor
View profile
James Hyams
View profile
Vishal Beri Founder and Managing Director Aegis Consulting Group
View profile
Victor Perton Founder
View profile
Grant Spork Director
View profile
Lewe Atkinson Global Partner
View profile
Jason Blake Philosopher
View profile
Mark Sawers Ambassador to the Central African Republic, Djibouti, Ethiopia and South Sudan and Permanent Representative to the African Union and the UN Economic Commission for Africa
View profile
Pablo Riveros (edtechaus) Ed Designer | Emerging Technology Advisor
View profile
Amanda Shepherd Creative Fox and Co Founder
View profile
Laura Chassaigne
View profile

There are currently no documents available

 

Are you sure you want to do this?