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Moscow rules

The Challenge

In part three, Four Corners investigates the central allegations that members of the Trump team, including possibly the President himself, actively colluded with Russia to subvert American democracy.

In Australia, the question is about the extent to which Australian interests are in fact served by politicians in Government positions. Not only China, but also the Mafia, and the Murdoch press have at times been identified as self-interested players that are able to exert significant influence on the decision-making of Australian politicians.

The big question is whether or not we can regulate the influence of self-interested actors on Australian politicians?

What do you consider we need ‘more of’, and what do we need ‘less of’ to strengthen current policy, legislation and regulation?

How effective can legislation and policy be if one takes into account the current political/economic/technological culture?

 

Each Monday MindHive Number One ranked consulting problem-solver, statistician, Peter Grimbeek, leads a challenge based on Australia's Four Corners’s investigation. We take seriously the often quoted, “if you’d like to continue the conversation head to our Twitter or Facebook site”. What’s missing with that invite is that the Mindhive platform in particular offers an ability to collectively co-create potential solutions and generate ideas based on the challenges that the investigation provides. The outcome of the Mindhive challenge facilitated by Peter forms the basis of a 600-1000 idea published on Mindhive, and where appropriate submitted to the ABC and other mainstream media. Mindhive allows for impact recognition by ORCID, uniquely identifying academic and other contributors, and thus ensuring that you get credit for your work.

 

Challenge Opened: 12:03 AM, Monday 04 June 2018
Challenge Closes: 01:30 PM, Friday 29 June 2018
Time to go: Closed

 

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The context

In the second of a two-part Four Corners series (http://www.abc.net.au/4corners/blood-ties-promo/6590810), investigative journalist Nick McKenzie examined the link between a number of Australian politicians, from local to federal government, and alleged Australian Calabrian Mafia figures.

Among them is a former mayor of an area in Perth and a Labor Party figure from Melbourne. New South Wales police files also reveal the Calabrian Mafia has built close ties to outlaw motorcycle gangs (OMCGs), including the Rebels and Bandidos.

Victorian Labor party delegate had close ties to Mafia The ABC has evidence Victorian Labor Party delegate Michael Teti, who is now an ALP councillor at Moreland City Council in Melbourne, spent months doing banking for and running the fruit business of convicted crime boss Frank Madafferi. While there is no suggestion Mr Teti was involved in drug trafficking, he allegedly supplied a gun to one of Madafferi's mafia henchmen which was then used to threaten a woman.

Documents obtained show that Mr Teti acted as an adviser and gofer for Madafferi while the mafia boss was facing serious drug trafficking charges. Madafferi was convicted over the world's largest ever drug bust in 2007, when authorities seized four tonnes of ecstasy tablets imported in tomato cans. During this period, Mr Teti also secured one of Madafferi's associates a job in federal Labor senator Mehmet Tillem's office. In March, despite knowledge within the Labor Party of Mr Teti's ties to a crime figure, the ALP invited him as a delegate to the party's state conference, allowing him to vote on policy and party issues. Following inquiries from the ABC, the ALP said on the weekend it would now seek to expel Mr Teti from its Victorian branch.

Former WA mayor faces accusations he led mafia cell. Court documents from ongoing proceedings in Italy also show Italian prosecutors allege Tony Vallelonga, who is the former mayor of Stirling in Perth, is the local leader of a mafia cell in Perth. Court files allege that Mr Vallelonga is responsible for "making the most important decisions, imparting orders or imposing sanctions on other subordinate associates". The files allege Mr Vallelonga was concerned about a rival who wanted to start his own cell on Mr Vallelonga's turf with the approval of Calabrian bosses.

Challenge Opened: 12:03 AM, Monday 04 June 2018
Challenge Closes: 01:30 PM, Friday 29 June 2018
Time to go: Closed

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Thought Leader

Peter Grimbeek Statistics & Methods Counsellor
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Urs Meier Partnerships and Collaborations - Research and Knowledge Melbourne - Smart City Office
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Bill Wyatte Integrated Criminal Justice Governance and Program Manager
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Jon Eastgate Partner, 99 Consulting
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Lloyd Taylor Consulting Partner
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Documents associated with this Challenge

File name File type Date uploaded Size (KB)
Mafia in Australia_ Major drug trafficking group linked to senior politicians.pdf
.pdf
6/4/2018 119
The Mafia, the mountains and the art of holding your tongue.pdf
.pdf
6/4/2018 1,955
 

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