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What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

The challenge

Future-U.org is a not-for-profit founded to help everyone thrive through the age of massive transition that new technologies are initiating. As AI, bots, digital assistants and automation replace more and more tasks that humans have performed, it is our position that relying only on unplanned luck to ensure people have the skills they will need to thrive in a post-work world is really not going to cut it.

When luck is no longer enough, enter the Future Literacies Framework (Future-u.org/flit).

Mindhive Challenge part 1- 

A community response to what ‘creativity’ in a post-work world needs to look like 

The challenge as Future-U sees it:

While some would say that humans have always coped with new automation technologies and adapted and adjusted, Future-U has been founded because such a business-as-usual approach is too risky now when even conservative predictions are that 40% of us will be ‘jobless’ in 15 years time. Its true that humans are great adapters of course - but now that automation has moved from primarily replacing human effort in the physical realm to also doing it in the cognitive realm, the idea of what makes humans unique and even needed requires addressing. In the 1700's and 1800's there were many who had to deal psychologically with being replaced by a steam engine when formally their strength or endurance were highly prized. The worry today is that learners who are still being told they must be cognitively 'strong' will also soon get a very rude shock. In response, Future-U has been created as a non-profit to  uncover the kinds of new mindsets or expectations that mean such a shock is only a stepping stone not an end point.

The first mindset Future-U is working to spread is 'to thrive tomorrow, today's learners need to know how to dream up their own job, roles and vocations'. If this could become the new agreed upon direction that education was pointing towards, curriculum, assessment and the whole bag could be unified with the common goal of giving learners the meta-skills they need to do this dreaming, whether as entre or intra-preneurs, and a post-work future would see people  empowered to contribute rather than go the way that idle populations historically do.

To this end, the Future Literacies framework posits 5 domains of meta-skills which can allow learners to thrive, either by mastering them all, or by knowing how to combine their skills with those of others. This framework has so far been peer-reviewed by over 50 educators and leaders and has been designed to continue to evolve with a modular structure so it can be both big-picture enough to point the way forward but also be customisable for each organisation or classroom that comes across it.

For this opening Mindhive challenge, the first Future Literacy of ‘Creativity’ will be our focus. According to the framework, this domain includes elements from both the artistic (born an artist) and corporate (a process anyone can learn) understandings of what the creative process looks like: a sense of play, curiosity, deferring judgement, maker mindset, being iterative, growth mindset, being ok with failure, showing resilience and critically reflecting. 

It’s no secret that divergent thinking studies show a massive drop in the abilities of learners from the start to the end of formal schooling - so this discussion challenge seeks the help of the growing Future-U community to map out what this crucial first Future Literacy really needs to look like.

What does ‘creativity’ in a post-work world need to look like? Go…!

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Contributions in this phase will be credited as part of ongoing development of Future-U resources towards a mini-book on the topic of this challenge, which will also be used for helping to spread the word on why skills in this area will be so vital for today’s learners. If you would like to join our community, please find us at twitter.com/jnxyz, facebook.com/futureuorg or email contact@future-u.org.

 

FUTURE LITERACIES FRAMEWORK: (more at future-u.org/flit)

 

Challenge Opened: 09:06 PM, Thursday 24 August 2017
Challenge Closes: 09:30 AM, Thursday 09 November 2017
Time to go: Closed

 

Do you want to contribute to this challenge?

The context

Challenge Opened: 09:06 PM, Thursday 24 August 2017
Challenge Closes: 09:30 AM, Thursday 09 November 2017
Time to go: Closed

Do you want to contribute to this challenge?

Challenge Activity

Challenge Activity

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Luke Jaaniste is now contributing to this challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

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Luke Jaaniste commented on the challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

A future of 40% unemployment, because the AI and bots are doing all the work... 

if that is the case, the first thing to worry about is the distribution of resources so that 40% are destitute, homeless, etc etc... 

but let's say we solve this, through some governmental/institutional/social creativity, that finds a way to satisfyingly distribute resources in ways that most citizens feel is acceptable, but based on something other than individual work-rates (income-deriving work-rates are what modern post-slavery societies have been recently based on, and after industrialism stripped from many people their ability to solve their food and shelter needs all by themselves or in small groups)... maybe some kind of baseline universal citizens' income... 

ok so let's say we solve the resourcing and distribution issues... another big thing is what people spend their time doing, if before they were 'working' in a 'job'... actually this might not be hard to work out, we just need to ask everyone already functioning well outside of 'paid jobs', including children and teenagers, retired/elderly, volunteers, artists, those who can't work for various disabilities and whatnot, the super rich and the super poor, and so on...

we will probably find that having fun, individually and together, in ways that give a sense of connection and warm social bonding, is what all of these functioning not-paid-jobbers are on about. it's what we seek out... by fun I don't mean something frivolous although it includes this... by fun I mean, the joy of living on earth in ways that feel enlivening and the expanse of our surroundings, ecology, horizons are expanding all the whilst are beating hearts of connection are beating and connecting... 

it's no fun when the social and natural ecologies are crumbling or operating in unhealthy, blocked up and malnourished ways, and so a lot of the creativity to come will be synching in with the creation of the planetary systems and how our massive social systems can better connect and synergise with the even more vast systems of Earth. otherwise we are super screwed...

 

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Simon Pockley is now contributing to this challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

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Simon Pockley commented on the challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

(first comment)...

I'm not sure if this is right place to jump in but here's a story that I think might add to the mix of perspectives. Some years ago I supervised a PhD student, Lisa, who was a dancer and an animator. She went to Antarctica and spent time with scientific researchers such as physicists and biologists [http://www.antarcticanimation.com/].   She invited them to explain what they knew about their data in ways that mean something to her. She told them they would be recorded and that she was paying particular attention to their gestures and tone of voice.  Later Lisa asked for copies of their data and set about animating it in ways that corresponded to their gestural movements and tones. One scientist, who had been studying krill for over 20 years, made circular gestures with his arms. His data was about the different temperatures of the ocean around krill masses. When Lisa showed him the data animated with his circular gestures he had a light bulb moment in understanding what his data was saying about the vortices that krill masses created. Many of the other scientists shared similar insights into their data and Lisa went on to show her animations at Antarctic conferences. Today she works across disciplines with an initiative called Living Data [http://www.livingdata.net.au/].

This story is intended to illustrate the value of having access to a form of intuitive, or what some like to call, 'body knowledge'.

Another example of accessing this form of knowledge comes from my own experience. Where, in 2013, I suddenly found myself in exactly the kind of post-work space that encourages reflection. I had had a very busy job managing data sharing projects in 22 universities when a massive bush fire turned my 38 year home in the Warrumbungles in NSW to ash. Back in 1975 I had arrived, camped and built a house out of what was there. Now, 38 years later, I arrived, camped and built a house out of what was there. Life is circular. I've been at this rebuilding now for 4 years. The iterative process is documented in an ongoing series of 3:25 minute videos [http://duckdigital.net/Wheoh/]. Essentially, these videos are about process but they don't really cover the fact that I have no idea what I am doing or how I'm tapping into a kind of knowledge that is rarely spoken about. 

I will spend weeks (sometimes longer) thinking out how best to do something and then, when I've finally made the decision to begin, do something quite different. An example,that comes immediately to mind, is the building of an oven which also provided me with hot water for showers. It was the first thing I built while I lived in a tent. I spent weeks considering where best to locate this oven. It needed to fit in with any future plans for building location and I knew it would become a place people would gather around so there had to be room for this. I didn't want it to block any outlook of the landscape around. Finally I arrived at the ideal place. It happened to be where my campfire was. Just as I bent down to move the stones around the fire place, I found myself lurching off to a spot 10 metres away where there was a dead wattle tree. I cut it down, dug a hole and built the oven. You'll see the wattle lying on the ground at the beginning of the video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akUEIhe7Wn8

Why, I hear you ask? What happened is a process that has become very familiar. It resonates with the story about Lisa. The process of rationally considering the oven's location was thorough and comprehensive. But it was consciously rational. Once my rational mind was satisfied and a decision had been reached, my unconscious, intuitive mind was free to act. I doubt that my intuitive mind could have acted without developing the 'body knowledge' gathered through the rational process. I have many other stories about this process. In my experience this 'body knowledge' taps into some form of truth and leads to the creation of living structures - not 'dead' ones. By 'living' I mean solutions that work for us as humans and individuals. The  kind of creations that reflect our scale, our humanity and our separate but unique identities.  I'd be most interested to hear from people who have similar experiences and who can articulate this better than I.

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Future-U commented on the challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

Dear colleagues (forwarded to Jonathan)

Here are my thoughts on ways of enhancing or eliciting creative.
solutions or ideas.  I've expanded my notes from Monday's Hot Futures meeting to make them more self-explanatory.  The last few are additions.

In forming groups where creativity is valuable I encourage high
diversity on as many dimensions (gender, age, qualifications,
experience, ...) as possible.  I do intense relationship building so
that people identify with the group.  I urge group members to value
different views and to respond to disagreement by seeking
"best-of-both-worlds options.

This can be further enhanced by encouraging a sense of play and
experimentation.

There's a philosophy in "Improv" (improvisation in live theatre)
that can be used to enhance creativity.  Improv players try to react
to what other players do by accepting it and then taking it further.
("Say yes and then build on it".)  This can be applied to processes
like brainstorming.

I think there's a principle behind the virtue of diversity.  When
something unexpected attaches itself to an emerging idea (or
solution or whatever) then creativity often increases.

Much of the 1960s literature could be viewed as offering techniques
for adding an unexpected dimensions to people's individual or
collective thinking --
   • transformations: minimise, magnify, take the opposite, ...
   • ask people to include a "wild idea" in their reports
   • ask them not to say which of their ideas is wild
   • change the physical setting or venue etc
   • embed participants in a fantasy scenario of some sort
   • explore an issue via a metaphor rather than directly.

Pose a deliberatively provocative question while discouraging
negative or critical responses.

In brainstorming ...  (1) warm people to the task with a fast-paced
imaginative activity: "How many uses can you think of for ... (brick
or paperclip of whatever);  (2) Aim for quantity not quality;  (3)
forbid criticism of any ideas.

Cooperative competition.  Ask participants to outdo one another in
such things as building on ideas, or developing wild ideas, ...

Creativity first, then enhance with a checklist.  Brainstorm (or use
nominal group technique, or use "think-pair-share").  Then use a
checklist to tap dimensions of the problem (or whatever) that might
not otherwise be addressed.

Psychoactive drugs

In the 1950s and 1960s"Synectics" was a professional group of
problem solving consultants.  They hired themselves out to develop
solutions for intractable problems.  They recorded each session and
analysed it later to identify which behaviours triggered the ideas
that led to a solution.  They found that their most creative ideas
arose when nobody in the team had expertise directly relevant to the
problem.

(There is a literature.  The key authors are W.J.J. Gordon and
G.M. Prince.  Or search for "synectics".)

Wild cards.  Draw a random idea or concept and inject it into the
discussion.  For instance, take a random word from a dictionary.  Or
combine random ideas at random and encourage wild thinking, for
instance by forming a matrix of dimensions of the issue (on one
axis) and other random concepts (on a second axis).  Allot different
cells in the matrix to difference group members to consider what
thoughts are triggered by the intersection of the two axes.

"Pizza boy".  Invite a stranger into the group.  Or ask one of the
groups to become a pizza boy and ask deliberately naive questions.

Or appoint a "court jester" to interject crazy-wild ideas at random
intervals.

Or invite a precocious 5-year-old into the group and praise them
whenever they say something outrageous by vaguely relevant.

Imagine a solution by deliberately neglecting any obstacles or
hindrances, and then work backwards from the solution to develop a
path to the solution.

Use a "magic wand" to overcome an obstacle or hindrance and thus to
develop a solution.  Then find ways of achieving the solution.

Etc.


Cheers   --   Bob Dick

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Eyal Chipkiewicz commented on the challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

Indeed an interesting discussion so far!

I recently heard a talk by economist Jason Potts on arts funding in which he proposes [my paraphrase] to introduce a model of arts funding parallel to the R&D funding model, in which "failure" is accepted as a structural risk, therefore eliminating the "fear of failure" from being a governing force.

I am linking that to this discussion in terms of considering the importance of risk in fostering a creative mindset. I would argue that Ian Plowman 's inverted relationship between creativity and power is linked to the inherent risks of creativity and the threats it poses to power. 

Could we also argue that in a sheltered world in which automation provides the basic needs, the cost of risk would be significantly less than it is now (where a "creative" mistake might evict you from the safety of a place in the "system")? And that with less at stake to lose, humans will set their creativity looser?

However (back to a point I was making earlier), this same creativity might lead to the exploration of new areas (and the new activities that they entail) and therefore create new work rather than just fill up bored/jobless time.

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Rhys Cassidy commented on the challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

I was recently sent a link to Improve Me which can help people identify their strengths in creativity and other areas. 

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Rhys Cassidy is now contributing to this challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

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Rhys Cassidy commented on the challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

It can be interesting to compare the experience and process of creators within and across disciplines. 

Hans Zimmer: 

https://medium.com/the-mission/heres-what-hans-zimmer-says-about-the-shameful-agony-of-creativity-eb28e00940e4

Giorgio Moroder:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhl-Cs1-sG4

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Jonathan Nalder commented on the challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

Jonathan, Future-U founder here: 

A start for now as we go thru the transition to potentially a post-work era is to embed ideas workflows and value for creative process inside as many orgs as possible such that it's not such a huge shock later once jobs/industries disappear. I know of one great Brisbane startup doing this from almost day one, where every new employee's orientation includes knowing how to suggest ideas and where they will travel in the org, as well as when they will be given time to work on and develop their solutions. This will probably be a shock already for the predominantly new to the workforce employees - but better to get a taste of operating this way now than later in life?

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Future-U commented on the challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

Would love to invite everyone who has contributed here online to also join us for a face to face meetup Fri Sept 22 :)

 

invite

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Peter Grimbeek commented on the challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

We're not too good at future-guessing - much better at predicting the past. So, cannot discount these scenarios in advance.

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Peter Grimbeek is now contributing to this challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

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Peter Grimbeek commented on the challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

Bruce Sterling's book, Distraction, outlines a near future world that is at once familiar and deeply strange. In the America of Distraction— the center has long since ceased to hold. The ongoing greenhouse effect has led to disastrous new weather patterns. Ocean levels are rising. Entire species are disappearing at a record rate. On the international front, the Chinese have won a decisive victory in their "economic war" with the United States by the simple expedient of publishing all proprietary American software over the Internet. In the aftermath of that defeat, chaos and fragmentation reign. Sixteen distinct political parties now exist. Emergency Committees have usurped the constitutionally created branches of government. The military can no longer pay its bills. Cities have become privately owned entities. The unemployed underclass has evolved into competing nomadic hordes that are often better organized than the government itself. The country, as one character puts it, "is up on blocks," desperately seeking its lost center; in need of a miracle capable of making "laws out of chaos, justice out of noise, and meaning out of total distraction."

This is a world in which centralising forces have ceased to hold, and where in the midst of a sometimes desolate landscape, large groups of people have chosen to live in creative ways.

For those seeking visions of a post-work creative world, this book provides a witty snapshot.

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Ian Plowman is now contributing to this challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

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Ian Plowman commented on the challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

Hi Folks,

My first post to an exciting thread of conversation.  A couple of random reflections/comments.

First, I notice that the medium of this conversation is linear - in time.  Creativity may well be messier than this.  

Second, my doctoral research examined why innovation in collectives is so hard.  The answer lies in the fact those those who gravitate to positions of leadership are commonly driven by need for power.  Need for power is inversely correlated with creativity, not only in the leader, but also in the followers.

Third, and also directly drawn from the same research, is that need for power is generally highest in first-borns, and that it is latterborns who are commonly the most creative - yes there are exceptions.  This becomes significant when we realize that the average fertility (birth rate) of women is in steep decline, and, for the first time in human history, first-borns are in the majority in the developed world.  Our society, in consequence, is becoming more conservative and less creative.

What to do?  My experience tells me that creativity can be learned, even by conservatives.  The starting point is to create a sense of wonder, a sense of suspended belief.  This is precisely what magicians do.

We live in a world where innovation (generally regarded as the operationalisation of creativy) is generally a collective endeavour.  Yet organised collectives unconsciously tend to suppress innovation.  So we need new methods for collective dialogue.  "Co-operative Conversations" is a suite of skills that enable the nurture of creativity into innovation.

 

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Jonathan Nalder is now contributing to this challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

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Future-U commented on the challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

Response from Reid Moule via LinkedIn:

If anything has changed over the last century it is the pace of change itself. We have gone from one major discovery every 50 to 100 years from the 1st to the 14th century to more scientific discoveries in the last 17 years than in the whole of human history. For the first time in history the science is leading the mathematics. And the number of discoveries is accelerating. Daily. So if you're think life will go along the way it has for the past twenty years you are in for a rude shock. Things will change so rapidly over the next twenty years that today will seem quite quaint in 2037. So what does it mean for us? And what does it mean for employment? Because of the introduction of robots into the workforce the 2015 CEDA report predicts the loss of five million jobs, or 40% of the workforce being unemployed in Australia by 2027. The implications for a declining tax base and an aging population are obvious. One of the realities of the aged pension was that it was originally designed to meet the needs of the deceased. The expectation was that the majority of those moving into retirement would pass away with five years of retiring. The extended lifespans of today's seniors, with an average age of 80, has disrupted this model. Which leads back to the question. How do western governments deal with declining revenue and increasing costs? One way is to increase the age at which people are entitled to a pension. Another is to change the way that entitlement is assessed. Governments are looking at both of these approaches. But there is another problem. The jobs that are disappearing are service level jobs. These are traditionally the jobs that are entry-level and employ most of our youth. The cohort that robotisation will have the most effect on is this group. At this point in time in Australia the youth unemployment rate sits at 13.1 percent. One thing any society knows, from a historical perspective, is that you cannot have large groups of unemployed, disengaged youth. These are the ones we try to inculcate our values and mores into because they are the future of this country; they are our future. So what can we do? The simple but complicated truth is that we cannot continue in the current mode. We just can't. It is time for another model, because all the old social and economic models are no longer viable. They are not viable both in terms of their damage to the environment and ultimately, their damage to people. Rutger Bregman in his book, <I>Utopia for Realists</I>, claims that the universal basic income (UBI) is a necessity in the age of the robot. Citing Brynjolfsson and McAfee (2014) who linked the current decoupling of wages and productivity to the effects of technology Bregman makes the argument that, rather than being alarmed about technology taking over jobs, it is an opportunity to reduce the traditional work week to a fifteen hour week and introduce a Universal Basic Income. But is that the only answer? Ironically, the new sensor-based internet of things technology may provide some alternatives. Many years ago I had the utopian dream, as many had, of returning to the land but not in the conventional sense. I believed that the ideal lifestyle was one that disconnected you from the grid and allowed you to provide for all of your basic needs. However, I was also a realist and saw that, for many who pursued this lifestyle it resulted in a much longer work week and actually chained them to their land. Animals and crops need tending, water systems and machinery need maintenance and this takes both time and money. So not only do you need to provide enough food for your family, you also need to have a saleable surplus. I saw that technology could be used to free people up and allow them time away from the 'farm' but the cost, at that time, was horrendous. In 1982 it would take nearly two million dollars to achieve this - at a time when you could buy a house on most of our major cities for less than $40,000. Fast forward to today and the cost and types of technology available make this more than realisable. The internet opens up the world and sensors open up remote monitoring and management. A lifestyle on the land, disconnected fromthe grid is doable. So why not create two economies- an industrialised, robotised economy and a green economy. The problem is that in a green economy with a focus on community, in a way of life that could be called modern Amish, there would be little need for mass produced goods and no taxable income. Governments will need some form of tax base but in the western economies we have an aging population at the same time as tax income is shrinking and social costs are rising. The mantra of capitalism has always been to privatise the profits and socialise the losses but how does that work when you have a disengaged workforce who live in a green economy and don't require the goods that robots produce? That is the inevitable and unavoidable outcome of this rush towards robotisation. The question isn't one of what does creativity need to look like but rather what will society look like when governments are no longer able to govern.

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Denis Tebbutt is now contributing to this challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

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Denis Tebbutt commented on the challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

Well I am in the post-work era and have discovered a whole new part of my creative self that has surprised me.  The reality is our environment doesn't always call for or allow us to develop those parts of our brain that feed the creative juices, but we do know now that the plasticity of the brain is very adaptive and can change in support of new approaches.  I think we should not confuse creativity with creation as one is the vision and the other the execution, some of the most successful new inventions have come about through partners and not just one person.  Many professions educate and train out creativity as it is a risk, but as humans those professionals have the capacity to be creative even though they have not been required to develop that side of them.  Unleashing the creative side and developing your capability does need help and support not barriers

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Bill Wyatte commented on the challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

Nothing that Nugget Coombes didn't recommend by way of reforming the Australian Public Service nearly 40 years ago...   I may be over-simplifying, but it appears to me that those things that liberate performance also liberate creativity.

- Establish in institutions' DNA that change is essential - if they are not changing they are becoming discordant with their changing environment.  (Status quo is a source of power in bureaucracies, so creativity can be limited to that which shall not impact the status quo.  What percentage of an institution's effort is expended looking backwards, maintaining the present and moving forwards?)

- Shifting from process-compliance to principles-based choice-making (In a diverse or dynamic environment, there is no automatic "right way" to get the best result - the quality of the result should define the rightness of the way.  Compliance dominates creativity, where principles-based arrangements can liberate it).

- Flatter devolved structures - creativity may better survive without the passage up hierarchical decision-making structures geared more to corporate risk aversion and reliability than to the presenting local issue.

- Institutions' purposes should be defined externally, not by the institutions' themselves, for self-interest will ultimately corrupt the latter approach.

*shrugs*  All of this stuff suggests essential human capabilities, suggesting skills, suggesting educational objectives and outputs.*

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Timothy London is now contributing to this challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

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Bill Wyatte commented on the challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

Building applied creativity into the future settings of all of our institutions will create a benevolent societal environment for any creative capability liberated by new developmental mechanisms.  And create a legitimacy of demand for that creativity.

On the other hand, failure to do so will result in that creativity being obstructed by institutions best positioned to benefit from it.  In a post-employment society with all of the inequality inherent in such a model, the resulting frustration could be very disruptive to established orders, particularly in tandem with other economic and social drama arising from population pressure, sustainability, geo-political conflict and the economic growth model topping out due to a diminishing feed-stock..

Imagination is  a driver of revolutionary change.

 

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Ed Bernacki is now contributing to this challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

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Ed Bernacki commented on the challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

I read through much of the talk about creativity and suggest a place to start is a simple understanding of creativity from Edward de Bono.

Idea creativity vs Artistic creativity -- the value of separating these concepts:   “The English language does not distinguish between idea creativity and artistic creativity. Because of this failure of language, people are reluctant to accept that idea creativity is a learnable skill.  Once we have separated idea creativity from artistic creativity, then we can set about learning, and develop the skills of learning for new ideas.”

I believe that there is great value in separating these concepts. What is the focus of this work? 

I read much more of the five future literacies. While interesting, I found this very limited in its scope.Is there nothing useful that was conceived 10 or 15 years ago, or before that?  

The list of items reads like the latest consulting concepts... 

Design thinking is the tool de jour.  It is a pretty weak problem solving tool. Where is brainstorming? Read the 1953 or 1965 versions of Applied Imagination to realize how little we know about the true concept of brainstorming as a problem-solving process.   Where are concepts like TRIZ? What about other tools?  Kids who go into STEM could learn TRIZ.  

Nothing by Edward de Bono. This is very odd that none of his work is of value. Lateral thinking. PO. Six Thinking Hats is still the best team tool I know.  Kids love it. 

Nothing about cognitive diversity -- understanding your style of thinking relative to others. 50 years of research on this work.  This is likely the biggest insight I have had....we still design systems as if all people think alike. How kids and adults express their 'creativity' and solve problems is highly influenced by their cognitive style.  This is natural. What is not natural is ignoring these predictable differences. 

 

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Eyal Chipkiewicz is now contributing to this challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

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Eyal Chipkiewicz commented on the challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

I have a question for the group...

How do you envision this "post-work" world? Will it be pressed by an issue of joblessness or one of boredom?

Perhaps this conversation has been too quick to link creative processes to material outcomes (such as the ones that would need to be replaced when (if) the traditional "job" disappears). But creativity underpins a very wide range of activities (and therefore motivations) from the search for meaning to the design of a faster, smarter gadget, and everything in between.

If we look at it from the "joblessness" perspective, we would argue that people will need to trigger creative processes to come up with new ways to address their basic needs. And if we look at from the "boredom" perspective, creativity would serve to entertain and to interfere with monotony. In both cases the creative drive of a few may well drive the activities of the many, i.e. discrete creative impulses would - much like today - trigger mass movements.

Can we not imagine then that - much like today - the creative impulses will continue to generate needs, markets and trends? Perhaps (as a couple have hinted at in the conversation already) we are living in an ever-more-creative world as there is either more need or more room for it. And perhaps (I am inclined to think) we shouldn't really be talking about "post-work" as though our participation will no longer be required for society to function. The nature of work may well be shifting (as it did from agriculture to industry and then to service), but we are still building social and economic structures around us, our desires and aspirations, and I think we will continue shaping and reshaping them to no end. 

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Susan Bond is now contributing to this challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

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Susan Bond commented on the challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

OK - first mindhive post, here goes (be gentle).

When a group of people with vastly different skill sets work together on a problem, amazing things occur. Each of them wouldn't necessarily consider themselves as "creatives", but the mix of thinking creates something far larger than the sum of its parts.

In my mind, building a creative culture involves nurturing the "mindsets" of both individuals and organisations so that we identify outcomes (not outputs), work on the important things (that people care deeply about), invite the right people to the "room" (not necessarily just those within your current place of work or your current networks), and facilitate an environment that brings the best out in everybody.

To do this, we must challenge the governance processes associated with traditional ways of working that far too often discourage long-term planning, openness and cooperation in order to focus purely on profit and short-term success.

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Tony Day is now contributing to this challenge What does 'Creativity' need to look like in a post-work era?

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